Getting Dumber

Today’s Slice of Life post at TwoWritingTeachers.org

Today I really felt the effect on my brain when using texting to communicate in our fast-paced world. I fear my mind is deteriorating! Or at least giving me new opportunities for problem solving.

I was standing in the line at the supermarket and I checked my messages…

First I went back to the Christmas decoration section and put this giant tree into an empty cart. Then I felt I had to send a bit of an explanation as to why I texted this random contact to ask if he wanted me to buy him a Christmas tree. (This is not the first time I have texted the wrong group or individual.)

Next, I read the text above from another person. I have learned to read auto-correct spelling now, so I assume we will use this book for devotions rather than deviations.

Finally, I was writing to tell my husband I joined the queue at Aisle 13 with my Christmas tree. Before I sent the Aussie text, I noticed it, took a breath and laughed.

Overall, though, I am still grateful for the ability to communicate in this strange way.

8 thoughts on “Getting Dumber

  1. I think we’ve all been there w/ these texting mishaps. It’s like a letter delivered to the wrong house forty years ago. I always feel compelled to fix the typos, even though I know people can read past them. BTW, your post isn’t too late. You’re in the window MST.

    1. Thanks, Glenda! Yes, you’re right, I think we all do these texting errors! There is another texting mishap that I use sometimes that requires us to fix broken communication. I didn’t have an example yesterday when I was in the grocery line, but the kind that I find most confusing are the ones where someone leaves out, adds, or makes an error in a key tiny word–forgot to say “not”, a change in verb tense, or error in pronouns. Oh, my! I sometimes read (or write) the message exactly opposite of what was intended. Proofreading is my friend, and I’ve always taken pride in being a good one. However, that is another area in which I have lost brain cells!

  2. I was recently sharing a story with my fifteen-year-old about how one of my first phones had a walkie-talkie feature that his dad and I thought was fantastic. Texting is much better, quieter too! 🙂
    It is quite amazing how far technology has come in terms of instant communication. Auto-correct results always tend to crack me up a bit.

    1. Great story! I do love the quiet, introverted way of texting. It definitely fits my personality more. Your walkie-talkie story reminds me of real walkie talkies we used at Disneyland one year. We felt so connected and safe that day. We could meet up when and wherever we wanted to. It was so different than the usual way of meeting up, “OK, we will meet at the train station at 12:30 for lunch. Try not to be late!”

  3. Thank you for sharing this piece of texting humor. It happens to many – sending to the wrong person, auto-correction that changes the meaning, typos that might not make sense – especially when we are in a hurry. I blame my mistakes on the boxes being too tiny to see for my fingers to click the right ones. Mistakes aside, texting is a quick and easy way to communicate.

  4. Thank you for sharing these!! There is no end to texting goofs! They can be so funny. I try to slow down and pause – to no avail! Autocorrect adds the most amusement.

    Happy new year, Denise! It has been so great to get to know you through slicing and poetry this year!

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