Dare to Care

Creating, Contributing, Communicating, Connecting, Collaborating & Curating

31/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
0 comments

How to Add a Flickr Image URL to an Edublogs Post

One Carrot” image by Hada Litim on eltpics is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

I love using Flickr to post my own pictures. It’s a great resource for storing photos, up to a terabyte of image space for free. I also use others’ Creative Commons pictures, like the one above from eltpics.

Here is a presentation that will help you add Flickr images to your Edublogs website:

For those who know, is this the best way to do this in Edublogs? I know there are many other apps that automatically do the work of citing Creative Commons images in your blog posts.

If you have a favorite CC image resource, will you please share it in the comments below? Thank you!

More information:

Creative Commons – About Creative Commons Licenses, keeping the Internet creative, free, and open.

Flickr.com – Sign up for a free account.

What is Hotlinking? – Why You and Your Students Should Avoid It” – Free Technology for Teachers post by Richard Byrne (@rmbyrne), which suggests you NOT do what I do above because of some good reasons! Mostly I use my own images, but this post gave me some good things to think about before hotlinking to another’s image.

Thanks to Sue Waters (@suewaters) for tweeting me two additional resources for linking to your Flickr pictures.

  1. Embedding Flickr, YouTube, Tweets, Vimeo, and More – This is really easy on Edublogs. I don’t know why I forget about it. Click to learn a great feature of Edublogs.
  2. Sue also shared Compfight, one of those sights I slightly know about that adds the attribution. Here’s how you add it as a plug-in on Edublogs.

That reminded me of another favorite of mine–John Johnston’s Simple CC Flickr Search and the newer version.

28/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
8 Comments

#JJAProject – A Photo A Day in June, July, August

A summer memory from 2013

Summer is coming, and I believe it’s a perfect time to join a photo a day group.

Four years ago Sheri Edwards invited me to join in the 2011 inaugural summer of the #JJAProject–for June, July, August Project. It was started especially for busy teachers who might want to do a picture a day, but can’t commit during the school year. It sounded perfect, and I wholeheartedly jumped in that summer.

Mostly, it was a wonderful way to get to know members of my PLN. When people share their lives through photographs and stories, how can we not get to know them? It was a lovely experience, and I still appreciate the friendships that have developed.

In addition, a photo a day is a great way to archive memories. For instance, I just looked back at at this post from 2011, and I had warm memories of that summer when we painted Maria’s room RED and I went to an NEH Landmarks of American History summer workshop about Abraham Lincoln.

In 2013, I tried it again, and it was another great summer of photos, relationship building, and memory collecting.

I seem to be on a two-year track with #JJAProject, for now I’m ready to do it again this summer.

Would you like to join?

It’s easy! Here’s how you can participate:

  1. Take a picture a day starting June 1.
  2. Choose how you want to share it. Post it on Flickr in the #JJAProject group or share it on Instagram. Create a photo-a-day blog and write about it or simply attach it to a tweet on Twitter.
  3. Tag it and share it with the hashtag #JJAProject.
  4. One more important step is to leave comments on the photos of other participants, deepening friendships and connections with members in your PLN!

16/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
4 Comments

More Genius Hour in Kindergarten

Gregerson Quote

I don’t want children to stop asking questions. I want to be the teacher that welcomes provocative questions. That’s why I so firmly believe in getting out of the way of children and letting them question and learn. Genius Hour has been a way to affirm this in my classroom.

I’ve been wondering how to do more Genius Hour in my kindergarten class. It was great with junior highers, but kindergarten has been a steep learning curve. I’m still on the uphill. Faige Meller has been a great resource for me and others. She is an active Kindergarten Genius Hour teacher! I’ve had some successes with making; I wrote about it here. I thought I’d share some more that we’ve done in our class. Perhaps some reminders for me when I start with next year’s class.

First, just like with almost any activity in kindergarten, we don’t want to start Genius Hour until we have established rapport and routines with our young learners. They need to know they are in a safe learning environment where they are loved and trusted. They need to thoroughly know and practice the community’s expectations for behavior and how they get along with others in their new learning space. This will take weeks or for me and my children, maybe months.

In the meantime, during all of your days, starting on Day 1, we want to be sure to nurture young learners’ curiosity. Welcome questions, dive into inquiry, and laugh, learn and love with your students.

My students and I adopted this “Genius Hour anthem” from Debbie Clement,  “You’re Wonderful.” It’s a conversation between teacher and students:

Teacher: I think you’re wonderful. I think you’re marvelous. I think you’re beautiful and magical and filled with curiosity and dreams.

Students: You think I’m wonderful? You think I’m marvelous? You think I’m beautiful and magical and filled with curiosity and dreams?

Students: You’re right, I’m wonderful. You’re right I’m marvelous. You’re right I’m beautiful and magical and filled with curiosity and dreams.

It continues with the children telling the teacher she’s all these things, and then together they affirm they are all wonderful, marvelous, beautiful, magical and filled with curiosity and dreams. Singing a song like this has been a good reminder that we—teacher and children—are on an amazing and extraordinary adventure of learning together.

After building rapport, establishing routines, and celebrating love of learning with our students, we can start “Genius Hour” doing a group project replete with choices and high-interest. Choose a topic that has captured children during regular school day activities. Or survey students with the simple question, “What do you want to learn?” or “What problem do you want to solve?” and then choose a popular group topic from their responses. Tell the students they are going to do a group “Genius Hour” and that they can learn whatever they want to about the topic/problem.

Before they start, gather resources–a stack of nonfiction and fiction books, art and building supplies, videos, appropriate web pages, etc. Then allow students to choose between the different resource “centers,” real choices based on the group topic/problem.

In my kindergarten English class, which includes 100% English language learners, we did two group projects for Genius Hour. One was a big numbers project. For weeks, two children had been interested in big numbers. About every other day, they would come to me trying to tell me about a number larger than the one they told me before. A thousand, a million, a billion, a billion and one.

One day I asked one of my little number engineers if he had ever heard of a googol. His eyes lit up with curiosity as he laughed at the funny word. I showed him a googol on Wikipedia. When he saw how long the number was, he was rightly impressed. He went right to work writing a one with 100 zeroes following. The learning was contagious; others joined around the computer as I read to them about this big number. Still more became interested as they learned about the nine-year-old boy, Milton, who named the large number. It turned into our first group project. One small group joined the first boy on the floor writing out a googol on long strips of cash register receipt paper. Another group wanted to put together number puzzles. Still others wanted to count to 100 with the Macarena song we had done for our 100 Day Party.

She started with 10 and added 33 sets of three zeroes, each separated with commas--one googol!

She started with 10 and added 33 sets of three zeroes, each separated with commas–one googol!

When asked later to complete the sentence, “This year, I learned____,”  one of the big number children wrote, “…how to count to a googol.” Now, I realize, of course, that he didn’t really, but for this five-year-old child, the big numbers project was a significant and memorable learning experience.

The second project the kindergarteners did centered around “zig zags.” One girl brought in a zig zag for show and tell during Z week. The next day she brought strips of paper and asked if the other children could make them too. I made time, and they all created zig zags–some more springy and shapely than others. Later, these zig zags, plus many more, turned into animals, pop-up books, greeting cards and more fun maker projects.

Finally, after several months of 1) setting up our loving and safe learning environment and 2) doing group projects, I started having students choose their own individual or small group projects.

I introduced personal Genius Hour during what was called “activity time” in the kindergarten schedule. (It is perfect because I only have half of my class of 26 at a time during activity.) We have access to an ongoing supply of art supplies, building materials, and former trash for rubbish re-creations. Our class library has books on subjects of great interest to the children.

During an earlier activity period, I had told the students that their interesting art projects reminded me of Genius Hour. (I actually had not called our group projects Genius Hour yet.) “Maybe next activity time we will do Genius Hour,” I said to them, marveling about how creative and curious they were.

One little guy asked, “What is Genius Hour?”

“It’s a time when you get to learn or make whatever you want to.”

“I like that,” he said.

Who would not like that?

16/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
0 comments

May 16 #EdBlogADay

#EdBlogADay

Here are a few new blogs for today. I’ve read and commented on these posts. Enjoy!

Karen Foley (@kinderkfoley)
Blogs at Making My Way in K
Post: #Edblogaday: 3 Important Things to Remember at the EOY – I needed to read this today. We have 20 days left, and I don’t feel I’ve done enough.

Sarai Stetson (@MinecraftEduMs)
Blogs at MinecraftEdu Educator – Sarai teaches a 12-week Minecraft class. How cool is that? And she tells you all about it on her blog.
Post: Carpenter Blocks Mod

Robin Nehila (@radical_robin)
Blogs at Flip! Learn! Share!
Post: #AprilBlogADay Number Talks

Sandra Goodrich (@sanmccarron)
Blogs at Reflections of a Science Teacher
Post: Snow Days

14/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
0 comments

May 14 #EdBlogADay

#EdBlogADay

Here are a few new blogs for today. I’ve read and commented on these posts. Enjoy!

Nathan Bowling (@nate_bowling)
Blogs at A Teacher’s Evolving Mind
Post: On Teacher Quality and Solutions-Oriented Thinking – What a powerful writer! I’m looking forward to more blog posts.

Melissa Smith (@MrsSmith167)
Blogs at Crayons and Candy: A Teacher’s Journey
Post: I’m Working On… – Staying positive in the midst of testing stress!

Rebecca Cissel (@Rcissel)
Blogs at 21st Century Tekkie
Post: #edblogaday Day 12: Helping Students Cope With Testing – Another positive teacher during testing, helping others cope. Do you know about GoNoodle?

Molly Robbins (@robbinswriters)
Blogs at robbinswriters: I teach writing
Post: Reflective Time is Learning Time Great ideas reminding us to reflect and take care!

Kerry Gallagher (@KerryHawk02)
Blogs at KerryHawk02: Teaching HistoryTech
Post: The Student Data Privacy Balance – Be sure to read all the links and join the conversation about student privacy.

13/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
0 comments

May 13 #EdBlogADay

#EdBlogADay

Here are a few new blogs for today. I’ve read and commented on these posts. Enjoy!

Stacy Dillon (@mytweendom)
Blogs at Welcome to my (New) Tweendom
Post: Wonder by R.J. Palacio – I just had to read her post about one of my favorite books. Stacy has been blogging about tween books for ten years!

Stephanie Ranger (@StephWardRanger)
Blogs at Following the Yellow Brick Road
Post: A Moment of Humanity in the Classroom – A lovely story of making her classroom a safe place for all students, a place where they were free to talk about mental illness. Yes, some pay cheques aren’t paid in money!

Tom Krawczewicz (@tkraz)
Blogs at Like Krazy
Post: The worst advice I’ve ever heard about technology in the classroom – And it came out of his own mouth! What a riveting beginning to this post!

Urbie Delgado @urbie
Blogs at Connect the Dots
Post: High Hopes – Urbie is creating meaningful workshops tailored for his learners. (Even if they look like a crazy tractor!)

12/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
2 Comments

May 12 #EdBlogADay

#EdBlogADay

Four new blogs today! I’ve read and commented on these posts. Enjoy!

Melissa Oliver (@maoliver17)
Blogs at Reflections on Learning Visually
Post: #EdBlogADay: Why Blog?

Molly Knowles (@mollyknowles322)
Blogs at The World is Your Stage
Post: Tips and Tricks for A Great Kindergarten Showcase

Megan Morgan (@mrsmeganmorgan)
Blogs at Mrs. Megan Morgan: Leading by Following
Post: Thanks to Part 2

Ben Dickson (@BDicksonNV)
Blogs at Rummages&Ramblings
Post: #thankastudent

11/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
0 comments

May 11 #EdBlogADay

#EdBlogADay

Here are several special blogs for today. I’ve read and commented on these posts. Enjoy!

Kimberly Mitchell (@inquiryfive)
Blogs with Amy Spinelli at Inquiry Partners
Posts: Why We Love Spring (And You Should Too) and What Do You Have to Celebrate Today?

Julie Hiltz (@juliehiltz)
Blogs at Center for Teaching Quality: Julie Hiltz Blog
Post: TWO WORDS! Specific Feedback

Katrina H. Conde (@KHC222)
Blogs at Language Arts and Humanities in 5C
Post: Stepping Out of My Comfort Zone

Jennifer Laffin (@laffinteach)
Blogs at Sweet Writing Life
Post: See Every Student

Lisa Hollenbach (@lisa_hollenbach)
Blogs at Lisa Hollenbach on Medium
Post: What Must Die in Order for Education to Move Forward?

Beth Crawford (@bethctech)
Blogs at Backstage Guiding
Post: The Secret to High Performance

Jon Harper (@jonharper70bd)
Blogs at Bailey and Derek’s Daddy
Post: How To Write Your First Blog Piece

10/May/2015
by Denise Krebs
0 comments

May 10 #EdBlogADay

#EdBlogADay

Today’s blog posts I’ve read and commented on! Enjoy!

Christy Post (@christypost9)
Blogs at Elementary Principles
Post: Something I Would Love to Try

Carol Perry (@clperry55)
Blogs at Better is Possible
Post: Why Collaborate?

Connie Rockow (@crockow8)
Blogs at The Optimistic Educator
Post: I Am That Teacher

Dawn Ellis (@dellis222)
Blogs at The Upfront Educator
Post: The Banana Tangent

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry (@DoctorDea)
Blogs at Notions & Potions
Post: #EdBlogADay: Why Blog? Might I Wax Philosophic?

Cat Weer (@edutechchick)
Blogs at EduTechChick
Post: Teacher Appreciation Week